Tag Archive | walks

Regained Confidence

After my troublesome exploration of Waldoboro Town Forest, I wanted to try an easy stroll just to prove to myself that I had not developed a fear of striking out on solo adventures. Since the Coastal Mountain Land Trust had published a lovely guide describing all their land holdings along with trail maps, I flipped through the pages until I decided to seek out the St. Clair Preserve and Knight’s Pond.  According to the description in my pamphlet, the land trust trail was a mere 200 yards from the dirt road to the pond. Perfect! This should help me prove that my previous experience was just a fluke.

The fog was just lifting from the pond when I parked near the boat ramp at the end of a long, dirt road. I stood by the ramp for a few minutes enjoying the view of water and the fog drifting through the trees, thinking that this was be a perfect place to to paddle around in the kayaks. Turning north towards a small picnic area where my map had displayed the trail, I searched but could not find any clearly marked path. The section of water near this area was boggier in nature, containing lots of grass and water lilies.

My lack of success did not stop me from exploring the area. After a disappointing search for said path, I turned south back towards the boat ramp and decided to walk along the beach. As the waterfront began to curve west, I discovered a trail nearby. I climbed up a small embankment and soon discovered an orange blazed trail leading through the woods. Since this path was on the wrong side of the boat ramp, it could not have been the land trust walkway. I knew that parts of this area had been previously owned by the Nature Conservancy, so I wondered if this had been part of the Conservancy trail system. I also knew that the Point Lookout Conference Center maintained a trail system that lead down to this body of water, so that was another explanation for this unknown road. In any case, I decided to explore.

As I walked along this wooded road with the water always visible, I studied the forest for the signs of late summer. It wasn’t long before I noticed the bright red berries of the bunchberries, the yellow spotted leaves of the Wild Sarsaparilla, the occasional discolored fern and the reddish-green berries of some unknown viburnum. I continued exploring until a reached a small point jutting out into the water. From here I could see a large expanse of the pond, a small island in front of me, and a shoreline to my left with grass and waterlilies. I felt a calmness here and I knew that my previous adventure had been an aberration. In the future, I would be able to continue my solo excursions into nature.

After turning back towards the boat ramp, I studied some vegetation growing near the edge of the water. I never did find out the identity of this grass-like plant bearing the remnants of white flowers but I thought they were beautiful. When I was done studying this interesting plant, I conversed for a bit with a man throwing a stick into the pond for his dog. We talked about different hikes and this particular preserve. He informed me that you could keep going on that path I had explored and take it almost the full length of the lake. Sounds like a great adventure for another day.

My goal had been achieved. My morning successful. As I drove slowly back up the dirt road, I glimpsed what could have been a trail just near the picnic area. Proof of that path must wait for another day.

 

An Uneasy Vibe

After returning from Seattle, I concentrated more on exercise hikes up the Multi-use Trail in the Camden Hills, but now as late summer approached, it was time to return to some exploration walks. My choice for the last weekend in July was to re-visit the Waldoboro Town Forest, located on Route 1. Since my last visit two winters ago, the town of Waldoboro had worked on the trail loop and held an official re-opening of the trail earlier this summer. I was curious to see what I would find during a visit in a completely different season.

There was only one other car in the parking area when I arrived. This did not disturb me since I had been on plenty of solo adventures during the last few years. I left the parking field, walked past the two Waldoboro Town Forest signs and entered the darkly, shaded pine forest.

Once in the woods, it was clear the work had been done in this preserve. The trail was marked by fresh blue blazes and an occasional brown hiking sign, brush was piled along the side of the trail and some log benches had been created from some of the remains of the clearing work. As I walked, I discovered some of the vegetation was beginning to show the signs of late summer; the Indian Root Cucumber displayed a slight hint of yellow, the Wild Sarsaparilla had acquired yellow spots and the single leaf of the Canada Mayflower was also beginning to turn. Further down the trail I found some tiny bright red mushrooms which could not be photographed due to the abundance of biting insects.

Not far into my walk, I came to the beginning of the loop through the preserve. At the intersection was one of those new benches mentioned earlier. The trail in front of me displayed freshly painted blazes, but the blazes were pretty faded on the trail to my right so I continued straight. It wasn’t long before I encountered a bog bridge that disappeared in the ferns growing over the planks. I’m not sure why but I began to feel a bit uneasy at this point and turned back towards the intersection. Not giving in yet to my sense that something felt wrong, I turned down the intersecting trail, only to discover a little way down the lane that this path also narrowed as the grass and underbrush took over before it disappeared completely. The fact that two marked trails just disappeared within a month of being re-opened, suggested that this preserve was not heavily used. For some reason I was spooked by this notion. I decided to trust my gut on this one and returned to the safety of my car.

Seattle Japanese Garden

After finally acquiring a trail map for the Washington Park Arboretum, I meandered a bit more, admiring the different sections of the park before making my way back to the my starting point at the Pacific Connections section of the gardens. I sat there for 20 minutes or so enjoying the scenery while waiting for the Japanese Gardens across the street to open. Nearing admission time, I exited the arboretum and strolled towards the next item on my list of Seattle places to visit.

Typical of Japanese Gardens in most places, I entered a sanctuary that enveloped the visitor with a spirit of tranquility and invited the weary wanderer to leave their worries behind. I walked along structured garden paths admiring everything from the placement of teahouses and pagodas, to the reflecting pool and the pink water lilies. I sat near the lilies just letting the serene atmosphere take over before moving on.

It was a small garden and I spent no more than 45 minutes there but it was enough to recharge my nature senses before having another go at the city. The next day promised rain and it would be a museum day, so I was glad to have this nature moment to carry me through.

Washington Park Arboretum

 

Volunteer Park – Seattle

The day after our adventures through Discovery Park, my husband started his conference and I was on my own to explore Seattle. Well, not quite. On discovering that I was planning on visiting Volunteer Park, our friends decided to join me, along with their dogs. We had agreed to meet in front of one of the many coffee shops, grab a cup and walk to the park. Along the way, we stopped at a local Farmer’s Market to buy strawberries and cherries for a shared snack later on.

Once at the park, we had to dodge our way around the barriers set up for a bike race before we could ramble along the greenery. We circled a reservoir, which had a nice view of the Space Needle. After passing the reservoir, we stopped at a small pond to watch the ducklings hiding among the vegetation before continuing on. Deciding it was time for a snack, we sat on a stone ledge near the Thomas Burke Monument enjoying the garden views and the fresh fruit purchased earlier in the day.

Refreshed, we made our way to the water tower within the park, where we climbed over 100 steps to the observation floor. There were wonderful 360 degree views of Seattle, the Space Needle and the mountains beyond (at least that is what I was told since I could barely make out the mountain range and certainly no Rainer). Around the observation floor was the story of the Seattle Parks. Here I learned that Olmsted was a key factor in developing many of the green spaces in Seattle. It was a gift that the local residents still enjoy today.

Once down from the water tower, we continued meandering through Volunteer Park past the conservatory and the temporarily closed Asian Art Museum. Behind the conservatory we let the dogs run a bit before leaving the park. From there, we crossed the street to step foot in another green space which I believe was Interlaken Park. We stayed a few seconds to look at the views before calling it a day.