Summer Visit to McLellan-Poor Preserve

After returning home from our Seattle trip, we took a few weeks to get back into our normal daily routines before setting out on our next adventure during the July 4th holiday. The local land trust had just recently completed a second entrance to the McLellan-Poor preserve on Route 1, and, since we had been stopped by our previous endeavor to explore this preserve due to an impassible river, we decided to approach the same river from the opposite side of the preserve.

During our approach to the trail-head, we spotted the sign for McLellan Poor just as we drove by, so we pulled into the Belfast Watershed parking area just on the other side of the Little River in order to turn around. Observing the casually mowed trail beyond the kiosk my first thought was that anyone who has the slightest tick phobia would not like this path. But I dressed appropriately for this type of hike, so I wasn’t too worried about the trail conditions.

In the open meadow near the kiosk, there was an abundance of wild vegetation to study and identify, so we spent a few moments there. Near the sign was a rather tall plant with multiple flowers forming a crown at the top, similar to Yarrow but the leaves were different. I later identified this as a Valerian. The field was also filled with Cow-Vetch and some rather nasty looking Thistle Leaves. I assume the rather tall thistle not far from the path was a Bull-Thistle. There was also a number of small flowers about ½ inch across which I identified after we returned home, as Common Stitchwort

Once, we were done marveling at all the flowers in the field, we continued our journey towards the woods. The trail was still very narrow with vegetation alongside the path close enough to brush against our clothing. I knew a number of acquaintances in our town who would get the heebie-jeebies walking through this.  In fact, during this part of our adventure we followed the barely visible line of trail through a stretch of what we could only call a fern forest. Here again, we stopped multiple times trying to identify the various ferns.

It wasn’t long before we passed through the ferns and found ourselves deeper in the woods walking on a wider forest trail. We were occasionally treated to glimpses of the reservoir to our right. In a few places, the trees became more widely spaced and we were able to stand on the ridge for a few moments and enjoy a much better view of the water. As we journeyed towards our destination, we crossed several bog bridges. At the edge of one of these bridges I found a cluster of Wood Sorrel, which I carefully stepped over as I crossed the bridge.

During this adventure, we took the two loops displayed on the trail map in order to cover the entire preserve on this side of the river. Just beyond the intersection of the last loop with the Reservoir Trail we came to the waterway that had prevented the continuation of our winter explorations. We actually did not recognize it devoid of the snow covering the rocks, the footprints of those who went through the ice in an attempt to cross and the lower water levels. This time of year one could easily cross along the rocks that formed a small island in the middle of the river. I had heard that the field near the original trail-head was filled with lupines but it was getting a bit warm so we decided to turn back and prepare for our July 4th celebrations.

 

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