Great Salt Bay Farm

A hint of summer was in the air when I decided to head down to Damariscotta and explore the Great Salt Bay Farm. I arrived mid-morning and stood for a few minutes near the kiosk trying to locate the trail. From where I stood, I could see an expanse of lawn and a pond but no clear direction around the area. A gentleman finishing up his morning walk pointed the way and I was off.

The first section of the trail, took me through lush, green fields sprouting wild strawberry flowers, violets and dandelions. This area was also filled with bird song. I watched as birds flitted about, unable to identify any one of them but one bird did stand out. I spied a rather large black and white bird as it settled in the grass, flew a short distance and settled down again. After consulting my bird book, I was pretty certain that I spotted an Eastern Kingbird.

Reaching the top of a hill, I studied the area in all directions trying to determine where the mowed trail continued before heading downhill away from the water view. For a few minutes I wondered if I had made a mistake as I schlepped through a rather wet muddy area, but no, the path continued towards a wooded section of the property. When I thought about walking this area, I had decided since it would be flat, I would be okay with sneakers rather than boots but I soon discovered that I had made a poor choice since more than 50% of the area was wet.

Entering the woods, I found a blanket of the ubiquitous Canada Mayflower leaves, along with Wild Sarsaparilla. The ferns in this area had almost completely unfurled, although a few still displayed some artistic curls as they continued the unfolding process. I soon came to an area where several rough shelters had been erected around the trees. Here, I had to look around a bit to locate the continuation of the trail.

The path soon left the woods behind and led me near a marshy area of the farm. Not only did I have to cross a rather questionable bridge across the water, but, when I reached the other side I had to struggle a bit to climb up the eroded bank. Back on the grassy lane, I encountered two women coming from the opposite direction. We chatted a bit before one of them pointed out an osprey carrying a fish towards its nest. We watched its flight for a while before continuing on our respective journeys.

I made my way towards the point, where the women told me I would see the shell middens. I found this rather odd since I knew the large midden was on the opposite side of Route 1 but I headed towards the point anyway just to explore what was there. A few benches had been placed around the point for travelers to pause and watch the activity on the bay. A short distance further on, I spotted a patch of Red Columbine. Interestingly enough, they were growing in an area that was covered with shells.

Returning from the point, I walked the Chestnut Grove loop, passing underneath the osprey nest. It was getting warmer and I was getting tired, so I opted out of the Bay loop, continuing on the most direct trail towards the car. It had been a lovely hour of exploration but now I had fabric to buy for my next quilt project and needed to get on with that task.

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