A short stroll along the Belfast Rail Trail

After our difficulties hiking in Tanglewood during the melting season, we decided to find some place that would get us outside and not be so taxing on us, physically. This would be tricky, for not only were we dealing with slushy snow but we were approaching mud season; a most unpleasant time for exploring hiking trails. In fact, the forecast for the next day was another 3 to 5 inches of snow, letting us know that even though the calendar said April, winter was not done yet. I finally suggested that perhaps the Rail trail in Belfast would be manageable as it meandered along the Passagassawaukeag River and was more exposed to sun.

Since I last visited the Belfast Rail Trail, the path has been connected to the downtown area of Belfast. With this in mind, we decided to park in town and walk along the paved path by the river towards the pedestrian bridge and the Rail Trail. We encountered many people enjoying their stroll within the confines of the town; a clear indication that “if you build it they will come”. It certainly served to get people outside even though the trail conditions in other venues were no longer ideal.

Once we passed the pedestrian bridge and continued underneath Route 1, we were pretty much on our own. The Rail Trail was created with fine gravel, so I thought this would be better than hiking through slush or mud but even here the snow was still firmly in place along the trail. Although the snow was a bit slushy, it was not as arduous as our hike through Tanglewood the week before, however, given the consistency of the snow, we decided that we would walk to the next parking area before turning back towards town.

It was pleasant walking along the river, so we stopped a few times to admire the view; a stream running down the hill towards the river, the remnants of an old bridge and the vegetation beginning to bud. Along the way, I discovered a leaf that had left its impression in the melting snow. It was amazing that the dark color of the leaf was enough to cause the snow under it to melt faster than the surrounding area.

We soon reached our turn around point, where we paused for a moment to look further down the trail before turning back towards town. Even trails like this will just be easier after the snow is gone for the year.

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